MHS Hurricane Response

MHS Helps with Hurricane Evacuations

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MHS Rescue Team 2008 Hurricane Journal

An emergency response team from the Michigan Humane Society received a transfer of 48 dogs from the SPCA of Texas.  The transfer took place at the Humane Society of Missouri and was representative of the outstanding collaborative efforts of animal welfare organizations across the country - ensuring that our four legged friends are not forgotten in times of natural disasters and other large scale emergencies.   “As with Hurricanes Katrina and Rita, MHS is committed to being a part of the solution that helps ensure the health and well-being of the companion animals in the affected areas,” commented Cal Morgan, MHS president and chief executive officer      

Fleeing Gustav
While MHS will not have teams on-site in the affected areas as with Katrina and Rita, the lessons learned from the previous disasters and the positive impact of the current assistance program can’t be overstated.  “We as an organization and as part of a community of animal welfare professionals have made tremendous strides in our preparedness and ability to successfully manage large scale emergencies, ” added Morgan. “And while our primary service area remains southeastern Michigan,  MHS is at the ready to assist in time of crisis.” Morgan also serves as the acting President of SAWA, the Society of Animal Welfare Administrators, an organization comprised of a administrators from humane organizations nationwide with the expressed purpose of ensuring the highest standards and levels of care within the animal welfare community. 

Fleeing Gustav

The transfer of current adoptable animals from the SPCA of Texas will greatly enhance the Dallas-based organization’s relief efforts, including the transfer of animals from Louisiana.   The newest members of the Michigan Humane Society family arrived at the organization’s Berman Center for Animal Care in Westland and most are available for adoption now. 

“Our first goal through the entire process is to minimize the stress on the animals while maintaining their optimal health” noted David Williams, MHS chief operating officer. “Once the animals have had a chance to acclimate to their new surroundings, we are confident that the communities of metro Detroit will once again step forward to help by providing them and the other current residents of MHS’ animal care centers permanent, loving homes.”  

Cal Morgan summed up MHS’ current relief activities with the most important observation: “Our ability to act locally and when needed  to extend our reach to all the borders of this country is made possible solely through the generosity of the MHS family which is made up of individual and corporate supporters throughout Michigan.  And on behalf of the animals who need us most, thank you.”  The Michigan Humane Society is one of the nation’s largest and oldest humane organizations, serving the metro Detroit area since 1877.  MHS is not subsidized through government funding and touches the lives of more than 100,000 animals each year through the donations of individual and corporate citizens.     

To support the work of the Michigan Humane Society inclusive of its emergency response services, click here to donate.

Fleeing Gustav

 

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